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authorScott Freeman <gsfreema@gmail.com>2017-06-30 13:19:40 (GMT)
committerScott Freeman <gsfreema@gmail.com>2017-06-30 13:19:40 (GMT)
commit18ac27fa981bba7c316693ed396bd4f816658932 (patch)
tree26e22cdc585e499d8ebd73fdbbc7c61bc90f89b6 /README.md
parent217ab30d021f27be6fe4f35126a88e592366acbf (diff)
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README.md link and grammar fixes
Fixing various typos, grammar mistakes, and broken links in the root README.md file.
Diffstat (limited to 'README.md')
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1 files changed, 8 insertions, 8 deletions
diff --git a/README.md b/README.md
index abd081a..902e6c8 100644
--- a/README.md
+++ b/README.md
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ as part of the application (if desired), and thus can be updated quickly to fix
## If You Just Want to Use .NET Core
-Most users don't need to build .NET Core from source since there is already an built and tested version for any supported platform.
+Most users don't need to build .NET Core from source since there is already a built and tested version for any supported platform.
You can get the latest **released** version of the .NET Core SDK by following the instructions on
the [.NET Core Getting Started](http://dotnet.github.io/getting-started/) page.
If you need the most up to date (daily) version of this .NET Core installer you can get it from the
@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ make a complete application. More on this in the [Using Your Build](Documentati
The first step in making a build of the CoreCLR Repository is to clone it locally. If you already know
how to do this, just skip this section. Otherwise if you are developing on windows you can see
-[Setting Up A Git Repository In Visual Studio 2015](https://github.com/Microsoft/perfview/blob/master/documentation/SettingUpRepoInVS2015.md)
+[Setting Up A Git Repository In Visual Studio 2017](https://github.com/Microsoft/perfview/blob/master/documentation/SettingUpRepoInVS.md)
for for instructions on setting up. This link uses a different repository as an example, but the issues (do you fork or not) and
the procedure are equally applicable to this repository.
@@ -125,12 +125,12 @@ The build has two main 'buildTypes'
* Debug (default)- This compiles the runtime with additional runtime checks (asserts). These checks slow
runtime execution but are really valuable for debugging, and is recommended for normal development and testing.
* Release - This compiles without any development time runtime checks. This is what end users will use but
- can be difficult to debug. Passing 'release' to the build script select this.
+ can be difficult to debug. Pass 'release' to the build script to select this.
In addition, by default the build will not only create the runtime executables, but it will also
build all the tests. There are quite a few tests so this does take a significant amount of time
-that is not necessary if you want to experiment with changes. You can submit the building
-of the tests with the 'skiptests' argument to the build script.
+that is not necessary if you want to experiment with changes. You can skip building
+the tests by passing the 'skiptests' argument to the build script.
Thus to get a build as quickly as possible type the following (using `\` as the directory separator, use `/` on Unix machines)
```bat
@@ -162,14 +162,14 @@ There are two basic techniques for using your new runtime.
1. **Use dotnet.exe and Nuget to compose an application**. See [Using Your Build](Documentation/workflow/UsingYourBuild.md) for
instructions on creating a program that uses
- your new runtime by using the NuGet packages you just created and the'dotnet' command line interface. This
+ your new runtime by using the NuGet packages you just created and the 'dotnet' command line interface. This
is the expected way non-runtime developers are likely to consume your new runtime.
2. **Use corerun.exe to run an application using unpackaged Dlls**. This repository also defines a simple host called
corerun.exe that does NOT take any dependency on NuGet. Basically it has to be told where to get all the
necessary DLLs you actually use, and you have to gather them together 'by hand'. This is the technique that
all the tests in the repo use, and is useful for quick local 'edit-compile-debug' loop (e.g. preliminary unit testsing).
- See [Executing .NET Core Apps with CoreRun.exe](Documentation/workflow/UsingCoreRun.md) for details on using
+ See [Using corerun To Run .NET Core Application](Documentation/workflow/UsingCoreRun.md) for details on using
this technique.
## Editing and Debugging
@@ -184,7 +184,7 @@ make modifications and debug any issues those modifications might cause. See t
## Running Tests
After you have your modification basically working, and want to determine if you have broken anything it is
-time to runt tests. See [Running .NET Core Tests](Documentation/workflow/RunningTests.md) for more.
+time to run tests. See [Running .NET Core Tests](Documentation/workflow/RunningTests.md) for more.
## Contributing to Repository